Creating A Media Kit

I passed my Hubspot exam on the first try, which is rewarding; the next step is to promote it everywhere (this web site, LinkedIn, etc.). Most importantly, I’m going to use the knowledge I gained during the course to develop what I’m calling “Media Kits.”

This is the kind of thing that Hubspot encourages, and that marketing/design studios work on all the time — a package of online and off-line material that publicizes, promotes, and in some cases operates as damage control for a company. It’s an easy thing to set to the side in the chaos and busy day-to-day activity of running a business, or a non-profit organization. But at the same time it’s something that’s so essential that everyone needs it. You can’t get anyone to pay you if they don’t know you’re there, after all.

What is in a Media Kit? I’m still developing that, though I think back to when I was writing music reviews, and we would receive the following. Keep in mind this was the early days of the internet. There was email and bulletin board systems, but no YouTube or Facebook, not even Myspace. To promote yourself in those days you had to send pieces of paper by mail!

A press kit would include:

  • Pictures of the musicians, in a black and white format.
  • A one-page summary of what they were promoting (usually the latest album, or an upcoming show in town).
  • A CD copy of the album, and once in a while, even a cassette. It would have something like “For Promo Use Only” on it, but otherwise it was just like a CD you’d get at the store. I guess I was pretty limited in my music knowledge; in probably 10 years, I only saw one CD from a group I recognized: Van Halen, Best Of Volume I. I don’t know why it came to the newspaper where I was working; it’s not like a review by me was going to affect sales one way or another. But I did have the album, until I sold it in favor of the later 2-disc Van Halen greatest hits, which I haven’t listened to in a while, or thought about, really.
  • There might be a sticker or something too, but most kits were pretty simple. Nobody had money for publicity back then, either.
Media Kit CD - Van Halen

This is what it looked like, except with a gold “Not for resale” and some other text on it.

Media Kit sample - Paul Burch

You can see the “For promo use only. Not for resale.” down at the bottom there; I sold some of them anyway. This album is pretty good, though; I have another Paul Burch album too. Yes, it’s from the 1990s, I did say I’ve been doing this for a while.











I’ve since worked on publicity materials for a few organizations, but these days it’s mostly about a nice website and social media presence… which brings me back to this Media Kit idea. Establish a schedule for promoting content — informative, uplifting, not-directly-selling-based content — and make sure there’s enough material available if something goes awry. What does the schedule look like? What does the content look like? We’ll get into that next.

Hubspot Training

I’m studying for the Hubspot inbound marketing certification, the basic piece of marketing knowledge that people using the internet need. I have a few plans for what I’m going to do with it once I have it; I’ve talked with a few people about my ideas, and I think they’ll work. Plus, it’s something that can be broken down into individual elements, and those I can delve into more deeply here.

The part of the Hubspot certification that interests me most is the first step, “Attract.” This is where you take strangers and turn them into regular visitors to the site using tools like (as show by the company’s inbound methodology) blogs, keywords, and social publishing. There are statistics — Google Analytics — that show how many people visit the site, but as one of my advisers said, it’s mostly a vanity statistic. What you need is people who are actually reading to come back and investigate more. How does that happen?

From what I’ve seen, it helps to have a little bit of an established network. You can’t just post a website or a blog and expect it to take off. If you have an established name, even among just a few people, the website, the social media presence, will add to that existing presence and make it stronger. Working with established names: that’s one part of my idea. But one thing at a time; Hubspot certification first.

Improving The Site: What You Should See

Whew! A month (more) has passed since I last updated this blog here on the site. I am writing content other places but here, not as much. I do post updates whenever I have a new article published in one of the magazines I write for; it’s a great way to meet people locally, and I know it has a “long tail” — I’ll be the only one writing about Common Ground Church in Kalamazoo (unfortunately, it closed its doors this summer), for future historians to look back on.

It’s a place for both my work and my hobbies: I think both should be together, since both are part of who I am. It could use some touch-ups, though, so I’ll be working on that next. More activity coming for the site as I determine what it is I want to see here.

  • A simple list of articles and game material, with a little animation to make it more visually interesting
  • A regularly updated blog featuring updates on what I’m working on
  • More outbound links and suggested sites

This is all very straightforward, simple stuff, if you have any experience with web design. But it’s easy to overlook if you haven’t paid any attention to your own site… which is what is happening to me.