USR Wednesdays: Combat Variants

I’ve certainly looked at ways to mix up combat before. Let’s take a look today at a few more options to add something extra to your Domino Writing-style USR game.

Multiple Attacks

One of the biggest problems with classic role playing games is that boss monsters are just too easy to kill. Sure, the dragon has lots of hit points, and its breath weapon can knock everyone down by a third of their health if it hits, but the dragon only gets one attack. If the fighter, rogue, wizard, and cleric work together, they can take out the beast in no time. The answer is often give the dragon some orcish minions to fight alongside it, or allow it to breathe fire and scratch with its claws at the same time. Either way, the dragon can make several attacks, evening the odds it faces in battle.

In USR, we can do the same thing, giving a monster multiple attacks, instead of the one it normally gets (remember, in Domino Writing-style USR, a combat turn includes one move and one other activity, usually an attack). The limit is determined by the monster’s [Monster] Power Level.

  • The number of extra attacks a monster can have, above and beyond its regular attack, is equal to its combat bonus (Power Level I means no extra attacks, Power Level VI can have up to 5 for a total of 6 attacks in a turn).
  • Each extra attack a monster has costs it 3 starting hit points (one extra attack means the monster starts with 3 fewer hit points; five extra attacks means -15 hit points before the battle begins).

Note this only applies to monsters (which can be, of course, wolves, ninja, soldiers, trolls, robots, guards, or anything else). Heroes can’t buy extra attacks this way.

I am not left handed.
Gaining the upper hand is easy for two swashbucklers.

The Upper Hand

This one is borrowed from the Fate RPG, and it’s great for those games where combat is the exception, not the rule. You may need a marker of some kind, like a spare die, to represent having the “upper hand,” having fortune smile on you. The character who wins initiative starts with the “upper hand.” It stays with him or her until an enemy tries to steal it. If your ally has the upper hand when it’s your turn in combat, you can’t make use of it. But if an enemy has it, you can try and grab it from them. Then you’ll have it on your turn.

To “seize the upper hand,” you first make a non-contested die roll against a target number set by the game master (usually a 4 or a 6 — this should be relatively easy to do so the upper hand moves around a lot). On a success, you have the upper hand. On a failure, the upper hand stays where it is.

Whether you succeeded or failed on the upper hand roll, you can still make an attack roll on this turn (yes, you make two die rolls in one turn). If you succeeded at the upper hand roll, or you already had the upper hand from earlier in the battle, add your level to the attack roll, and even if you miss, you still cause 1 point of damage. If you don’t have the upper hand, you just make an ordinary attack.

The “upper hand” roll can be against any stat you wish on your first try, but it has to be against a different stat each time you try to seize it. The entire point is to generate cool combat maneuvers that aren’t necessarily damage-causing themselves:

  • Grabbing a rope and swinging into the fray
  • Dropping the perfect one-liner before opening fire
  • Calculating the exact coordinates for your attack to cause maximum damage
  • Mystically stopping time — for just a moment — to get into position
  • Spreading your wings as wide as they can reach, to strike fear in the heart of your foe

Nemeses

A discussion on the USR Google+ group about playing Pokemon in USR led to this idea: When a battle begins, select an opponent, who becomes your nemesis. You gain +2 on die rolls against the nemesis, as long as the nemesis is in the combat. If it’s defeated or otherwise leaves combat, you can name a new nemesis on your next turn.

Both heroes and monsters can select a nemesis on their turn, but someone can only have one nemesis at a time. A character can’t name an opponent as a nemesis if another character has already done so. Nemeses don’t have to be against one another: If you’re a police sergeant whose nemesis is Mario the mafia thug, but Mario has named your buddy the psychic detective as his nemesis, you get a +2 against Mario, but he doesn’t get a +2 against you.

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