Hubspot Training

I’m studying for the Hubspot inbound marketing certification, the basic piece of marketing knowledge that people using the internet need. I have a few plans for what I’m going to do with it once I have it; I’ve talked with a few people about my ideas, and I think they’ll work. Plus, it’s something that can be broken down into individual elements, and those I can delve into more deeply here.

The part of the Hubspot certification that interests me most is the first step, “Attract.” This is where you take strangers and turn them into regular visitors to the site using tools like (as show by the company’s inbound methodology) blogs, keywords, and social publishing. There are statistics — Google Analytics — that show how many people visit the site, but as one of my advisers said, it’s mostly a vanity statistic. What you need is people who are actually reading to come back and investigate more. How does that happen?

From what I’ve seen, it helps to have a little bit of an established network. You can’t just post a website or a blog and expect it to take off. If you have an established name, even among just a few people, the website, the social media presence, will add to that existing presence and make it stronger. Working with established names: that’s one part of my idea. But one thing at a time; Hubspot certification first.

My Secret To Success

The secret to success in the modern world of business is by offering value, providing something unique that you know people want. That’s a contrast to the “old days,” when people would find you because your business listing in the Yellow Pages started with AAA. And as I have written about before (a long time ago), monetizing journalism — making a living as a professional writer — is a puzzle that no one has solved. There are attempts to go into niches, the thousands of specialty magazines in the market today… for example, magazines about Kalamazoo and Lansing.

As I mentioned last time, here’s what I see is my value: I write short. I find out what’s important, and say it in a clear, concise way. I tell the audience what it really needs to know about the product or service, or news item, or whatever the topic is. How to earn money from that? Well, that’s what journalism is, explaining what’s really important, whether it’s the results of a new governmental policy or the need to highlight a small group of people doing something fun. It’s all about communication, and that is a job that does pay.

That's the goal, to get paid.

That’s the goal, to get paid. (image: John Ridley)

 

Back to our old question: how to monetize journalism? The answer is: you don’t. You can’t, even at the New York Times, which charges you to read most of their articles (called a paywall). They lift the paywall pretty regularly, and there’s ways to get around it. You can’t get paid (much) to write articles, though the magazines I write for have been fair and reasonable. Article writing isn’t a goal. It’s a tool to get to the goal, promoting yourself and your skills.  That’s how interviewees see it too: they want to be shown in the best possible light in a newspaper or a magazine, because people who read that article will then want to find out more about them, and ultimately pay them.

People won’t read an article about me, but they can see plenty of articles that I have written, and from there get an idea of what I can write, and what I can do to promote their business. That’s the secret to success, good content promoted well. That’s what we’re working on here.

Writing Short: What I Do For You

A summer has passed, and I am writing on this blog again. This time it’s after I’ve been considering just what it is that I offer my clients, both existing ones and ones that have not yet reached me. What do I do that adds value to their business? What do I do that no one else does better? There are many writers available online, even some offering rock-bottom prices for their work (but remember, you get what you pay for — do you want just words, or actual writing?). But here’s what I do that others don’t: I write short.

Short-legged dachshund.

Short… you know, like a dachshund. (image: Michal Zacharzewski)

 

Writing short isn’t as easy as you might think. Anyone can write a sentence to say what they want to say, but figuring out what you actually want to say and just saying that is a different skill. An unskilled writer knows what they’re trying to say, but doesn’t actually say it, because they don’t know the right words, or because they can’t get the words from inside their head to the page. Mark Twain criticized James Fenimore Cooper for his poor writing in the “Leatherstocking Tales.” Those are rules I can follow, that others can’t:

12. Say what he is proposing to say, not merely come near it.

13. Use the right word, not its second cousin.

14. Eschew surplusage.

15. Not omit necessary details.

16. Avoid slovenliness of form.

17. Use good grammar.

18. Employ a simple and straightforward style.

There are 11 other rules in the essay too, but there are the ones I’m writing about now. “Writing short” requires focus: figure out what’s most important about the subject of the piece, and say just that, quickly. It’s what editors do in newspapers and online, when trying to get you to read their content (I haven’t been on Fark in a long time, but I know they used to pick the version of a story submitted by the person who had the best headline). Yes, the headline itself is a short version of an article, one designed not necessarily to deliver the information, but to get you to spend time and possibly money reading the entire story.

There’s also TV and radio news, where writers consolidate an entire newspaper article or even a piece put together by an on-camera reporter into a paragraph. Try this exercise: Watch the 11 p.m. news one night, and look for the big story, the one a local reporter is on camera taking about. Then watch the 6 a.m. news the very next morning. That same story will probably be there, using a lot of the same video, but simplified, shortened to just the key pieces of information.

A short news story like that, one the anchor reads while you the viewer looks at scenes of people doing something, or terrible destruction (house fires, say), is a paragraph of text, about 20 seconds long while reading it out loud. You have to tell people what happened and what its long-term effects are, all in 20 seconds. It can be done, by writers who know how to write short.

That’s one of the skills I can offer my clients, using “the right word” and not extra stuff. I talked about it a little bit on my revised LinkedIn page, and I’m spreading the word everywhere else I write too.

Also, my occasional series on the Kalamazoo Can-Do Kitchen and its graduates continues this month with features on two businesses in Greater Kalamazoo Women’s Lifestyle magazine.